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CLU-IN Studio
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Contaminated Sediments: New Tools and Approaches for in-situ Remediation - Session IV
Sponsored by: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Superfund Research Program
Original Time/Date of Presentation:

February 14, 2011, 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM, EST (19:00-21:00 GMT)

Presentation Overview:

This seminar will feature SRP grantees Dr. Harold D. May and Dr. Danny Reible. Dr. May, Professor, Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina will present "Integrating Microbial Biostimulation and Electrolytic Aeration to Degrade POPs" and Dr. Reible, Bettie Margaret Smith Professor of Environmental Health Engineering, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas will present "Funnel and Gate Approach for Active Sediment Caps".

Dr. May will discuss bioaugmentation of Fox River (WI) sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and testing with bioactive granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing PCB dechlorinating and degrading bacteria. He will also describe how electron donors and acceptors for microbial PCB dechlorination and degradation can be delivered electrochemically to further stimulate the biodegradation of these POPs. These methods show significant reductions in the concentration of weathered PCBs. Dr. Reible will show that although sediment capping is normally considered strictly a contaminant containment technology, it can trigger microbial processes to transform or detoxify both inorganic and organic contaminants. He will describe research exploring these microbial processes and ways of improving their effectiveness. The presentation will focus on how to enhance microbial transformation of hydrophobic organic compounds in sediment caps through the use of electrodes to change terminal electron acceptors and redox conditions.


Integrating Microbial Biostimulation and Electrolytic Aeration to Degrade POPs
Dr. Harold D. May, Professor, Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina

Bioaugmentation of Fox River (WI) sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), persistent organic pollutants (POPs), is being tested with bioactive granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing PCB dechlorinating and degrading bacteria. In addition, electron donors and acceptors for microbial PCB dechlorination and degradation are being delivered electrochemically in order to further stimulate the biodegradation of these POPs. Each of these aims is being met with success including significant reductions in the concentration of weathered PCBs due to the bioaugmentation or bioelectrochemical approaches.

Funnel and Gate Approach for Active Sediment Caps
Dr. Danny Reible, Bettie Margaret Smith Professor of Environmental Health Engineering, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas

Although sediment capping is normally considered strictly a contaminant containment technology it can trigger microbial processes to transform or detoxify both inorganic and organic contaminants. Research exploring these microbial processes and ways of enhancing their effectiveness will be described. The presentation will focus on how to enhance microbial transformation of hydrophobic organic compounds in sediment caps through the use of electrodes to change terminal electron acceptors and redox conditions.

Presenters: Instructors: Moderator:
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