U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Technology Innovation News Survey

Entries for February 16-28, 2014

Market/Commercialization Information
NATIONAL DEFENSE CENTER FOR ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT: INDUSTRY DAY
Department of the Army, Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4507, Solicitation W91ZLK14RNDCE, 2014

The Program Management Office for the National Defense Center for Energy and Environment (NDCEE) will host an Industry Day for parties interested in potential contracting opportunities in support of the NDCEE mission. The program's focus is on the demonstration and validation of DoD's high-priority environmental, safety, occupational health, and energy technologies. Topics include destruction of chemical and biological weapons; emerging contaminants; and remediation/cleanup/restoration of contaminated sites, among others. The Industry Day is scheduled for May 7, 2014, 9:00 am - 1:00 pm, at Dickson Hall, Bldg 3074, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The meeting will be unclassified and open to all interested contractors, large and small businesses, academia, and other government stakeholders. https://www.fbo.gov/notices/5ace695d11e32764e1b51bf27b242ff6


GROUND WATER PROJECT
Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Coast Guard, TRACEN Petaluma, CA.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4498, Solicitation HSCG49-14-Q-Q00014, 2014

The U.S. Coast Guard Training Center (TRACEN) Petaluma intends to have an environmental services company perform a comprehensive groundwater site investigation to determine if contaminants are leaching from the skeet range into the local groundwater. Constituents of concern associated with skeet range shooting operations include lead, arsenic, antimony, zinc, and PAHs from clay targets. The goal of the site assessment is to determine the nature and extent of contamination. Several endangered or threatened species may be present on site. Quotations are due on or before April 21, 2014, by 2 pm PT. This procurement is a total small business set-aside. Details of the opportunity are in a zipped file attached to the notice at FBO.gov. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/DHS/USCG/Tracen/HSCG49-14-Q-Q00014/listing.html


SUPERFUND TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND RESPONSE TEAM 4 NON-EMERGENCY (START 4 NE)
U.S. EPA, Region V, Acquisition and Assistance Section (MMC-10J), Chicago, IL.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4509, Solicitation SOL-R5-14-00005, 2014

EPA has issued a sources-sought notice to determine the availability of any types of small businesses able to provide technical expertise to support START 4 NE activities. These services primarily support the Emergency Response Branches in the Superfund Division in EPA Region 5 (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin), but contractors may need to respond to unforeseen national events outside the region. Activities described in the draft statement of work (SOW) include but are not limited to preliminary assessments, site inspections, testing, remedial investigations, feasibility studies, engineering evaluation and costs analyses, enforcement support, human health/health ecological risk assessments, and cost recovery. Capabilities statements are due by Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Use the search interface at https://www.fedconnect.net to locate the sources-sought description, SOW, instructions regarding the narrative statement, and supplier questions. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/EPA/OAM/MMC-10J/SOL-R5-14-00005/listing.html


AFICA: PERFORMANCE-BASED REMEDIATION (PBR), JB CHARLESTON, RFI
Department of the Air Force, Air Force Installation Contracting (AFICA), Lackland AFB, Texas.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4500, Solicitation FA8903-14-RFI-0020, 2014

The 772d Enterprise Sourcing Squadron/Environmental Contracting at JBSA Lackland AFB, Texas, is considering a performance-based approach for site closeout (SC) involving remedial action efforts at Joint Base Charleston (Weapons and Air) in South Carolina. The period of performance is ~120 months from date of award. The estimated contract rough order of magnitude is between $10 million and $20 million. Feedback from interested parties is sought through a market survey questionnaire attached to the announcement posted at FBO.gov. Responses to the questionnaire should be submitted by 12:00 pm CT, April 21, 2014. https://www.fbo.gov/notices/bbfec1ac59322a7ec52e0754b89276ea


NATIONAL SECURITY EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROGRAM (NSEPP)
Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Acquisition Management, Washington, DC.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4499, Solicitation SOL-HQ-14-00001, 2014

U.S. EPA's Office of Emergency Management has the need to establish a contract to support its National Security Emergency Preparedness Program. EPA intends to award a single indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract for support of EPA duties relating to program analysis, policy formulation and dissemination, and emergency response plan development and implementation. EPA anticipates posting the official request for proposals on or about April 2, 2014, on the FBO.gov website. Competition will be limited to eligible 8(a) concerns. The base period of performance will commence on or about August 30, 2014, and will be for 12 months with four 1-year option periods. The NAICS Code is 541620, with a size standard of $14.0M. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/EPA/OAM/HQ/SOL-HQ-14-00001/listing.html


BAA RESEARCH ON OIL SPILL RESPONSE OPERATIONS ON THE U.S. OCS
Department of the Interior, Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, Herndon, VA.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4492, Solicitation E14PS00054, 2014

The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement solicits white papers for specific areas of interest to the BSEE Oil Spill Response Research Program on Oil Spill Response Operations on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf. Among the eight specified topics is the need to develop a safe, low-emissions, in situ method to rapidly separate the oil and water recovered from a skimming system and utilize or burn off the recovered oil. White papers no more than 5 pages in length are due by 2:00 pm ET, April 10, 2014. If a white paper is selected for further evaluation, a technical and cost/business proposal will be requested from the submitting organization. https://www.fbo.gov/notices/bbd5f9342f46b370c80afe4c3122cd9f



Cleanup News
ACCELERATED REMEDIATION AT A REGION 1 RESIDENTIAL CLEAN-UP SITE USING PHILIS ON-SITE ANALYTICAL LABORATORIES
Capri, J., M. Nalipinski, and T. Smith.
NEMC 2013: The National Environmental Monitoring Conference, 5-8 August 2013. Abstract and 22 slides, 2013

In May 2012, EPA Region 1 sampled surface and subsurface soil, sump water, sediment, soil gas, and indoor air at select residential properties along Stevens Brook to determine the extent of coal tar waste contamination. Rapid, onsite analytical results were provided using mobile laboratory assets called PHILIS, the Portable High-throughput Integrated Laboratory Identification System. The contaminants of concern included benzene, naphthalene, and SVOCs, particularly PAHs. In the course of about 4 days, investigators collected over 250 samples and analyzed them for contamination on site. PHILIS provided same-day confirmatory data, allowing the OSC to make onsite decisions without the need for secondary confirmation from an outside fixed lab. The Region 1 OSC was able to confer with the Vermont regulators on a daily basis using the most recent PAH analytical data, which was summarized and depicted on site maps to allow better interpretation and clearer presentation. The OSC prepared a time-critical removal action memo recommending soil excavation at the Colony Apartments and the installation of a system to mitigate indoor air contamination.
Longer abstract: http://nemc.us/meeting/2013/load_abstract.php?id=145
Slides: http://nemc.us/docs/2013/presentations/Mon-Field%20Measurements,%20Sensors,%20and%20In-Situ%20Monitoring-1.5-Capri.pdf

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS CORPORATION, 3130 SOUTHWEST 17TH STREET, PEMBROKE PARK, FLORIDA (HWC # 023)
Florida Department of Environmental Protection, 6 pp, June 2013

Bioslurping involves simultaneous vacuum extraction of free product, soil gas, and groundwater from air-tight wells. Following a successful pilot test in 1997, full-scale bioslurping of LNAPL waste oil was conducted nearly round the clock at the Petroleum Products Corporation Superfund Site from 1999 until 2012, when recovery declined. Site data, including bioslurper operations and water quality, were incorporated into a GIS database to monitor remediation progress and support optimization of system performance. The bioslurp system was shut down from April to September 2000 to address extensive oil emulsification in the extracted groundwater, which blocked the carbon polishing system. The system design was refined by the addition of a chemical treatment to inhibit emulsification. Florida DEP fact sheet: http://www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/quick_topics/publications/wc/sites/summary/023.pdf
Illustrations in 35 slides: http://www.ctci.org.tw/public/Attachment/03310384071.pdf

PANTEX PLANT (USDOE), CARSON COUNTY, TEXAS
U.S. EPA Region 6, 10 pp, 2014

The Pantex Plant Superfund Site is located 17 miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas. It is an active federal facility owned by DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration. The Plant's historical waste management practices included thermal treatment of explosives (RDX, TNT, HMX), explosive components, and contaminated liquids and solvents (including test residues of depleted uranium), and waste discharge, burial, and disposal in unlined units, thus releasing chemical and radionuclide constituents to the environment. By 2009, two pump-and-treat systems and two in situ bioremediation (ISB) systems had been implemented to address different aspects of the plume of contaminants in the perched groundwater. Collectively, the systems work to reduce groundwater saturation in the thicker center and enhance degradation and attenuation of contaminants (mainly explosives constituents, chlorinated solvents, chromate, and perchlorate) along the extent of the perched groundwater. The ISB systems, which deliver injections of emulsified soybean oil, are located in areas more susceptible to downward migration of contaminants, where the saturated interval of the perched groundwater is thin and not amenable to extraction and aboveground treatment. http://www.epa.gov/region6/6sf/pdffiles/pantex-tx.pdf

FACT SHEET: MIDDLE RIVER, MARYLAND, MIDDLE RIVER COMPLEX AND MARTIN STATE AIRPORT
Lockheed Martin Middle River Complex, 8 pp, Aug 2013

Site investigations at the Middle River Complex identified two shallow groundwater plumes containing elevated concentrations of chlorinated solvents, mainly TCE, that originated from the industrial facility in the center of the complex. A biostimulation system was installed during 2013 to treat the two plumes, with startup anticipated in 2014. The system will rely on in situ bioremediation to reduce the highest groundwater concentrations of dissolved-phase TCE via injection of a mixture of water, food-grade vegetable oil, and lactate to stimulate indigenous bacteria to consume and break down the contaminants. http://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed/data/corporate/documents/remediation/msa/MSAMRCFSAugust2013.pdf

SIMULTANEOUS OXIDATIVE REDUCTIVE CHEMICAL TREATMENT OF PAH CONTAMINATED SOIL AT A FORMER MANUFACTURED GAS PLANT (MGP) SITE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA, AND PIPELINE SPILL SITES, ALBERTA, CANADA, USING I-ROX REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY
Ivey, G.A.
IPEC 2013: 20th Annual International Petroleum Environmental Conference, 12-14 November 2013, San Antonio, Texas. 29 slides, 2013

An innovative green remediation technology has been developed to treat a broad range of persistent organic pollutants, including PAHs and TPH. This presentation details the successful deployment of I-ROX technology for the treatment of PAH-contaminated soil originating from a former MGP in Victoria, Australia, as well as from multiple pipeline spills in Alberta, Canada. Following I-ROX bench-to-field implementation, remediation objectives were achieved in weeks to months, with the potential for reuse of treated soils on site by property owners. All sampling and analysis was completed by a third-party consulting firm. http://ipec.utulsa.edu/Conf2013/Manuscripts_pdfs/IveySimultaniousOxidative.pdf


Demonstrations / Feasibility Studies
PILOT-SCALE IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF HMX AND RDX IN SOIL PORE WATER IN HAWAII
Payne, Z.M., K.M. Lamichhane, R.W. Babcock, and S.J. Turnbull.
Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, Vol 15, 2023-2029, 2013

A 9-month in situ bioremediation study was conducted in Makua Military Reservation (MMR) in Oahu, Hawaii, to evaluate the potential of molasses to enhance biodegradation of RDX- and HMX-contaminated soil below the root zone. RDX and HMX in the subsurface occur in some MMR locations at concentrations that exceed their U.S. EPA preliminary remediation goals. A molasses-water mixture (1:40 dilution) was applied to a treatment plot and clean water was applied to a control plot via seven flood irrigation events. The difference in mean concentrations of RDX in pore water samples from the two test plots was very highly significant (p < 0.001), as were concentration differences with depth (p < 0.001). Degradation was greatly enhanced at depths from 5 to 13.5 ft. Enhanced biodegradation of HMX was also observed in molasses-treated plot samples but only to 5 ft depth. The molasses-water mixture had an infiltration rate similar to that of plain water (average 4.12 ft/day) and reached the deepest sensor (31 ft) within 5 days of application. Most of the molasses was consumed by soil microorganisms by about 13.5 feet bgs. An earlier paper on this project is available at http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1201&context=usarmyresearch.


EVALUATION OF BIOREMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED BENZENES AND BENZENE BY A NATIVE WETLAND MICROBIAL COMMUNITY AND A BIOAUGMENTED ANAEROBIC CULTURE
Lorah, M.M. and C.W. Walker.
IPEC 2013: 20th Annual International Petroleum Environmental Conference, 12-14 November 2013, San Antonio, Texas. 30 slides, 2013

Bioremediation is being evaluated for tri- and dichlorobenzenes, monochlorobenzene, and benzene in a freshwater wetland at the Standard Chlorine of Delaware Inc. Superfund site using field sampling, in situ microcosms, and flowthrough bioreactor testing. Both aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation occur in the wetland. Performance of bioreactors seeded with WBC-2, a dechlorinating culture developed for degradation of chlorinated ethanes and ethenes, was compared to a control bioreactor seeded with the microbial population from the wetland groundwater. Biodegradation of all compounds commenced without a lag under initial anaerobic conditions in the bioreactors. Degradation efficiencies were generally >80% removal for all compounds in the bioreactors under anaerobic conditions. High inflow sulfate (450-600 mg/L) and resulting high sulfide concentrations had no apparent effect on contaminant biodegradation. The control bioreactor with native bacteria showed similar removal rates for tri- and dichlorobenzenes under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, whereas monochlorobenzene and benzene degradation increased under aerobic conditions. The availability of a sediment-free culture, plus the ability of the native microbial community to degrade the site contaminants, provides flexibility in considering bioremediation options. http://ipec.utulsa.edu/Conf2013/Manuscripts_pdfs/Lorah_Chlorobenzenes_Bioremediation.pdf
More on WBC-2: http://md.water.usgs.gov/teams/fab/wbc2.html.



Research
PERSULFATE OXIDATION: AN EFFECTIVE IN SITU TREATMENT OPTION FOR 1,4-DIOXANE IN GROUNDWATER
Houston, K.
REMTEC Summit, March 4-6, 2013, Westminster, Colorado. Abstract only, 2013

Although 1,4-dioxane (dioxane) has proven recalcitrant to biodegradation, the compound is susceptible to in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) in persulfate and activated-persulfate systems. A multi-site series of lab treatability test results indicated that dioxane can be treated effectively under various persulfate activation strategies. Respiking studies showed that ambient activation (i.e., native mineralogy) is sustainable with respect to dioxane treatment. Field pilot test results from two sites also showed effective dioxane oxidation with persulfate. Following one injection, groundwater dioxane concentrations decreased by up to 96%, from 480 µg/L to 21 µg/L. Persulfate-based ISCO provides for an alternate or supplement to the default groundwater extraction treatment strategy in navigating dioxane sites to closure.


LABORATORY EVALUATION OF A PROSPECTIVE REMEDIATION METHOD FOR PCB-CONTAMINATED PAINT
Saitta, E.K., M.J. Gittings, C. Clausen, J. Quinn, and C.L. Yestrebsky.
Journal of Environmental Health Science & Engineering, Vol 12 No 1, 57- (13 pp), 6 Mar 2014

Previous work demonstrated that PCBs can be broken down at ambient temperatures and pressures through a degradation process involving magnesium metal and acidified ethanol. Two treatment options—the Activated Metal Treatment System (AMTS) and the Non-Metal Treatment System (NMTS)—can remove and degrade PCBs from painted surfaces. In tests, AMTS decreased the Aroclor® concentration of a solution by >97% within 120 minutes and the Aroclor® concentration of industrial paint chips by up to 98% over three weeks. After removing up to 76% of PCBs on a painted surface after seven days, NMTS also removed trace amounts of PCBs in the paint's concrete substrate. The evaporation rate of the solvent (ethanol) from the treatment system declined when the application area was increased. The solvent system maintained its ability to remove >90% of PCBs after losing 36% of its mass to solvent evaporation. http://www.ijehse.com/content/pdf/2052-336X-12-57.pdf


IN SITU REMEDIATION OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS USING POLYMERIC ABSORPTION SYSTEM
Quinn, J., R. DeVor, J. Captain, and K. Weis.
Book of Abstracts: Seventh International Conference on Remediation of Contaminated Sediments, 4-7 February 2013, Dallas, Texas. Battelle Press, Columbus, OH. 2013

A new polymeric absorption "blanket" technology is being developed for extracting and remediating contaminated sediments in situ, with minimal intrusion. The underside of the blanket is designed with spikes that penetrate the upper 6-inch layer of contaminated sediment and allow for the absorption of PCBs. The blanket then is removed and the PCBs it contains are treated using a complimentary technology known as Activated Metal Treatment System (AMTS). Initial work focused on identifying the most effective polymeric sorbent material for removing PCBs from sediment systems, which led to the development of the hollow polymeric blanket concept in which the interior could be filled with a solvent to force a concentration gradient to help increase PCB transport across the polymeric membrane. Further studies have been conducted on the insertion of small-scale prototype units at a local river to begin to determine the optimal geometry and mechanical properties of the blanket and explore possible deployment options. The prototype units are manufactured using a 3-D printer to produce the units for rapid testing. Current studies are focusing on the optimizing the geometry of the blanket's sediment-penetrating spikes and determining the radius of influence each spike achieves in situ. http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20120010674.pdf


MODEL PREDICTION OF LONG-TERM REACTIVE CORE MAT EFFICACY FOR CAPPING CONTAMINATED AQUATIC SEDIMENTS
Meric, D., F. Hellweger, S. Barbuto, N. Rahbar, A.N. Alshawabkeh, and T.C. Sheahan.
Journal of Environmental Engineering, Vol 139, 564-575, 2013

This paper describes the development and validation of a 1-D, large-strain, consolidation-coupled contaminant transport model. The RCM-XPORT2 model uses the CS2 large-strain consolidation approach coupled with reactive advective/dispersive solute transport through a deforming saturated porous medium, capped with a reactive sequestering geomaterial known as a reactive core mat (RCM). Validation of the model is presented by simulating consolidation-coupled contaminant transport experiments performed on naphthalene-spiked sediment from the Neponset River in Milton, Massachusetts. The paper presents a hypothetical case study of pre- and post-RCM application PCB fate and transport in the Lower Neponset River using RCM-XPORT2 and the U.S. EPA Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program surface water quality model. The Neponset River case study evaluates the long-term effect of sediment RCM capping on reducing the water column PCB concentration.


PAH CONCENTRATION GRADIENTS AND FLUXES THROUGH SAND CAP TEST CELLS INSTALLED IN SITU OVER RIVER SEDIMENTS CONTAINING COAL TAR
Kim, Y.S., L.M. Nyberg, B. Jenkinson, and C.T. Jafvert.
Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, Vol 15 No 8, 1601-1612, 2013

Short-term performance of permeable sand cap test cells installed over sediment containing liquid coal tar was monitored on the Grand Calumet River (Hammond, Indiana). The sand cap test cells included two sand-only cells, two test cells containing a sand/peat mixed layer, two test cells containing a sand/organoclay mixed layer, and two sediment control cells. In each test cell, six monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) and 12 PAHs were monitored over an 18-month period, and interfacial water flow was monitored periodically. Seepage velocities ranged from 3.8 cm/day into the sediments to 3.2 cm/day out of the sediments, with discharge out of the sediments observed more often. A ferric iron test indicated that stratified oxic-anaerobic layers were formed in the caps. Within the sand caps, concentrations of MAHs and PAHs fluctuated with time, more significantly near the bottom. Near the top, most of the MAHs and PAHs attenuated >95% in the first year of the study, but the attenuation rates decreased in the second year due to recontamination of the caps' surfaces by surrounding sediments. Results indicate that the rate and direction of sediment porewater flow is an important factor for properly designing any remedial sand cap, and that biodegradation of many of the MAH and PAH compounds likely was a major removal mechanism leading to attenuation through the test cells.


ASSESSMENT OF FIELD PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETRY FOR THE IN SITU DETERMINATION OF HEAVY METALS IN SOILS AND PLANTS
Gutierrez-Gines, M.J., J. Pastor, and A.J. Hernandez.
Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, Vol 15, 1545-1552, 2013

In a study to assess the use of a field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FPXRF) spectrometry system for in situ determination of heavy metal levels in soil and plant samples, investigators first optimized the method using 84 reference soil standards and soil samples from known polluted sites. The optimized method then was used to determine heavy metals at three abandoned mine sites and two sealed landfills in central Spain. Results indicate that the system provided data ranging from an acceptable to a high quality, especially for soil samples. Examination of the cost-benefits and sustainability of this instrument in relation to other techniques indicated that the use of the FPXRF system saved on costs, time, and materials when used for the preliminary screening of sites contaminated with heavy metals.


IMPROVING THE TREATMENT OF NON-AQUEOUS PHASE TCE IN LOW PERMEABILITY ZONES WITH PERMANGANATE
Chokejaroenrat, C., S. Comfort, C. Sakulthaew, and B. Dvorak.
Journal of Hazardous Materials, Vol 268, 177-184, 2014

A study was conducted to improve the sweeping efficiency of permanganate into low permeability zones (LPZs) to address high concentrations of TCE. Transport experiments quantified the penetration of various permanganate flooding solutions into an LPZ spiked with C-14 labeled TCE. MnO4- alone was inefficient in penetrating the LPZ and reacting with TCE due to a distinct manganese dioxide rind that inhibited the TCE from further oxidant contact. Including xanthan with MnO4- increased sweep efficiency, but rind formation was still evident. With the addition of the stabilization aid sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) with xanthan, permanganate penetrated 100% of the LPZ, no rind was observed, and the percentage of TCE oxidized increased. SHMP + MnO4- improved TCE destruction by ~16% over MnO4- alone (56.5% vs. 40.1%).These results support combining permanganate with SHMP or SHMP and xanthan as a means of treating high concentrations of TCE in zones of low permeability. http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1026&context=watercenterpubs


DETECTION OF MULTIPLE STRESSES IN SCOTS PINE GROWING AT POST-MINING SITES USING VISIBLE TO NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY
Lhotakova, Z., L. Brodsky, L. Kupkova, V. Kopackova, M. Potuckova, J. Misurec, A. Klement, M. Kovarova, and J. Albrechtova.
Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, Vol 15, 2004-2015, 2013

Heavy metal contamination, low pH, and high substrate heterogeneity are multiple stress factors that often occur at post-mining sites and inhibit environmental reclamation. Researchers tested the potential of visible-to-near-infrared spectroscopy to detect multiple stresses in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) at acidic substrates rich in arsenic. Reflectance data yielded comparable site separability with the separability calculated from laboratory data. The visible-to-near-infrared spectroscopy approach has potential for large-scale monitoring of tree status to assess reclamation quality in post-mining regions using airborne or satellite hyperspectral data.


COUPLED HYDRO-GEOCHEMICAL MODELLING OF A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR TREATING ACIDIC GROUNDWATER
Indraratna, B., P. Pathirage, K. Rowe, and L. Banasiak.
Computers and Geotechnics, Vol 55, 429-439, 2014

This study focused on coupling geochemistry with geohydraulics to enable time-dependent modeling of the remediation of acidic groundwater using an alkaline permeable reactive barrier (PRB). Chemical clogging due to secondary mineral precipitates reduced the porosity and hydraulic conductivity of the reactive medium. The governing equations were incorporated into commercial numerical codes, MODFLOW and RT3D. An original algorithm was developed for RT3D to simulate geochemical reactions occurring in the PRB. The results and the model predictions agreed, confirming that the hydraulic conductivity reduction due to mineral precipitation occurs at the start of permeation and continues until halfway through the testing phase. http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2470&context=eispapers


FE AND MN RECLAMATION USING BIOHAVEN® WETLAND REACTORS, RESULTS FROM 2012
Lennox, C.
15th Anniversary PA AMR Conference, 8-10 August 2013. Eastern Pennsylvania Coalition for Abandoned Mine Reclamation, 2013

Synthetic wetlands were placed in a 4 ft x 8 ft x 2 ft tall wooden box reactor through which passes a pretreated influent of acid mine drainage (AMD). BioHaven® islands, comprising a recycled plastic matrix, float on top of the water. Planted with native wetland vegetation, the synthetic wetlands act as a growth substrate for heterogeneous wild biofilm colonies that remediate iron precipitate and manganese oxides. Two units are in place at a Pennsylvania AMD site, installed in a settling pond below the mine site to filter the water before it flows into a creek. See floating wetland photos at http://plateauactionnetwork.org/summerlee-amd-bioremediation-treatment/ and https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150701912264220.399770.317395299219&type=3.



General News
VAPOR INTRUSION (VI) EXPOSURES: THE CHALLENGES OF, NEED FOR, AND BENEFITS OF LONG TERM STEWARDSHIP
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Association for Environmental Health & Sciences (EPA/AEHS), 18 Mar 2014

This one-day technical workshop focused on scientific observations and evidence regarding the accessibility and predictability of vapor intrusion (VI) exposures. The workshop presented evidence for the optimal condition and frequency of ongoing monitoring and protection from VI exposure under both natural (varying) and engineered (controlled) attenuation scenarios. The workshop included panel discussions on how the evidence relates to related risk management decision-making and response actions (i.e., balancing criteria) for VI mitigation strategies, as well as case studies of long-term management and refinement of mitigation approaches. Some presentations are posted with both audio and slides and others with slides only. https://iavi.rti.org/WorkshopsAndConferences.cfm


REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM CONTAMINATED AQUIFERS
Dermatas, D., I. Panagiotakis, E. Theologou, M. Chrysochoou, and T. Toskos.
ISWA 2013: Proceedings of the International Solid Waste Association World Congress, 7-11 October, Vienna. 7 pp, 2013

This review summarizes updated information on in situ remediation technologies for Cr(VI)-contaminated aquifers, with detailed attention to both biotic and abiotic reduction processes as well as precipitation and sorption mechanisms that can be used for chromium immobilization and remediation in contaminated groundwater. http://www.iswa2013.org/uploads/Dermatas_Dimitris_Remediation_technologies_for_hexavalent_chromium_fullpaper_216_EN.pdf


ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF PRIORITY CONTAMINANTS: A LITERATURE REVIEW
CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, Adelaide, Australia. CRC CARE Technical Report No. 29, 183 pp, 2014

A literature review was conducted to identify data gaps for compounds identified as first-tier priority contaminants in a 2012 CRC CARE workshop:
  • Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs): 209 congeners of brominated compounds used as flame retardants.
  • Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA).
  • Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).
  • Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a 5-ring PAH classified by U.S. EPA as a priority pollutant.
  • Polar transformation products resulting from the weathering of petroleum hydrocarbons, i.e., new compounds created as a result of incomplete biodegradation.
The review illuminated needs areas in toxicology and remediation technology for future CRC CARE research. http://www.crccare.com/publications/technical-reports


FUNGI AS BIOREMEDIATORS
Goltapeh, E.M., Y.R. Danesh, and A. Varma (eds).
Springer, New York. ISBN: 978-3-642-33810-6 (Print), 480 pp, 2013

This book highlights the potential of filamentous fungi in bioremediation and discusses the physiology, chemistry, and biochemistry of organic and inorganic pollutant transformations. The chapters are written by leading international authorities in their fields, representing the state of the science in the field of mycoremediation. The text presents different types of fungi and the associated fungal processes used for remediation in contaminated environments, covering aspects related to degradative fungi, biochemistry, enzymology, reactor engineering, genetic engineering, ecology of biodegradation, and practical applications. The Table of Contents and chapter abstracts can be viewed at http://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-642-33811-3.


A HISTORY OF MANUFACTURED GAS PLANTS AND NEW YORK STATE ELECTRIC & GAS CORPORATION'S ROLE IN THE INDUSTRY, 1800s-PRESENT
New York State Electric & Gas Corporation, Binghamton, New York. 299 pp, 2012

Section 1 provides an overview of the manufactured gas industry between the 19th and 20th centuries, explains the key manufacturing processes employed by the industry, and describes the impact of electricity and natural gas on the manufactured gas industry during this time period. Section 2 provides an overview of the manufactured gas industry in New York during the 19th and 20th centuries and places into context the 38 MGPs and affiliated properties for which the New York State Electric & Gas Corporation is responsible. Section 3 provides an overview of the environmental impact of MGPs in New York State, federal regulatory responses during the 20th and 21st centuries, and a case study of the removal of the Markles Flats Building from the Court Street MGP site in Ithaca. http://www.teamny-environmental-compliance.nyseg.com/NYSEG%20MGP%20Role%20in%20Industry%201800s-Present_August%202012.pdf


REFERENCE GUIDE TO TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR MINING-INFLUENCED WATER
U.S. EPA, Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation.
EPA 542-R-14-001, 94 pp, 2014

This report compiles information on selected technologies for treatment of mining-influenced water for an audience of interested stakeholders, including governments, the public, and the regulated community. It provides a short description of each treatment technology and presents information on the contaminants treated, pre-treatment requirements, long-term maintenance needs, performance, and costs. Sample sites illustrate considerations associated with selecting a technology. The report is not a comprehensive review of all current technologies, nor does it provide guidance regarding the selection of a specific technology. http://www.clu-in.org/download/issues/mining/Reference_Guide_to_Treatment_Technologies_for_MIW.pdf



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